United States of America

Overview and context

Laws
11
Policies
3
Litigation cases
0
Climate targets
24

Region
North America
% Global Emissions
12.28 %
Global Climate Risk Index
44.17
Income group (World Bank)
High income
Main political groups
G20; OECD
Federative/Unitary
Federative 50 states, 1 federal district; 16 territories
Region
North America
Income group (World Bank)
High income
% Global Emissions
12.28 %
Main political groups
G20; OECD
Global Climate Risk Index
44.17
Federative/Unitary
Federative 50 states, 1 federal district; 16 territories

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The Climate Change Laws of the World map helps understand our database information in context by showing climate laws, policies, and litigation cases in relation to key climate-related indicators.
Nationally Determined Contribution (UNFCCC website)
Legislative process
The United States has a bicameral legislature or Congress composed of the Senate (100 seats; 6-year term, with one third of membership renewed every 2 years) and the House of Representatives (435 seats, 2-year term). The last election for both House of Representatives and Senate was held in November 2016. The next election is expected in 2018. Bills may be introduced by a member of either cha

The United States has a bicameral legislature or Congress composed of the Senate (100 seats; 6-year term, with one third of membership renewed every 2 years) and the House of Representatives (435 seats, 2-year term). The last election for both House of Representatives and Senate was held in November 2016. The next election is expected in 2018.

Bills may be introduced by a member of either chamber. Typically, the first stage in the approval of a bill involves consideration by a committee. If approved (reported) by the committee, the bill reaches the floor of the chamber. Once a bill is approved by one chamber, it is sent to the other, which may pass, reject or amend it. In order for a proposed bill to become law, both chambers must agree on identical versions of the bill and the President must sign it. If the President vetoes a bill, the veto can be overturned if a two-thirds majority of both chambers vote to do so.

from the Grantham Research Institute
from the Grantham Research Institute
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