Nigeria

Overview and context

Laws
1
Policies
8
Litigation cases
1
Climate targets
8

Region
Sub-Saharan Africa
% Global Emissions
1.01 %
Global Climate Risk Index
104.83
Income group (World Bank)
Lower middle income
Main political groups
G77
Federative/Unitary
Federative 36 states, 1 federal capital territory
Region
Sub-Saharan Africa
Income group (World Bank)
Lower middle income
% Global Emissions
1.01 %
Main political groups
G77
Global Climate Risk Index
104.83
Federative/Unitary
Federative 36 states, 1 federal capital territory

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The Climate Change Laws of the World map helps understand our database information in context by showing climate laws, policies, and litigation cases in relation to key climate-related indicators.
Nationally Determined Contribution (UNFCCC website)
Legislative process
Nigeria features a bicameral legislature (the National Assembly), modelled after the political system of the United States. The National Assembly is divided into an upper house (Senate) and a lower house (House of Representatives). The Senate has 109 members, three from each state and one from the capital region of Abuja. Every four years, senators are elected in a popular vote. The House of Representatives h

Nigeria features a bicameral legislature (the National Assembly), modelled after the political system of the United States. The National Assembly is divided into an upper house (Senate) and a lower house (House of Representatives). The Senate has 109 members, three from each state and one from the capital region of Abuja. Every four years, senators are elected in a popular vote. The House of Representatives has 360 members who are elected for a four-year term, using a simple majority (first-past-the-post) system.

The last general elections (house, senate, and presidential elections) took place in March 2015. The next general elections will be held in 2019.

Proposed laws are called bills and can be introduced either to the Senate or the House. After its introduction in the legislative process, a bill is reviewed by a relevant committee, then referred to the National Assembly. In a sequence of three readings, the bill is discussed and modifications can be made. A bill is passed by a simple majority of the upper and lower house, which vote independently from one another. In order to formally complete the legislative process, acts have to be signed by the President (Presidential Assent).

from the Grantham Research Institute
from the Grantham Research Institute
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