France

Overview and context

Laws
11
Policies
16
Litigation cases
12
Climate targets
40

Region
Europe & Central Asia
% Global Emissions
0.69 %
Global Climate Risk Index
38
Income group (World Bank)
High income
Main political groups
G20; OECD; EU
Federative/Unitary
Unitary
Region
Europe & Central Asia
Income group (World Bank)
High income
% Global Emissions
0.69 %
Main political groups
G20; OECD; EU
Global Climate Risk Index
38
Federative/Unitary
Unitary

Visualise data on the map
The Climate Change Laws of the World map helps understand our database information in context by showing climate laws, policies, and litigation cases in relation to key climate-related indicators.
Nationally Determined Contribution (UNFCCC website)
This country is a member of the EU and so EU NDC data is being displayed.
For further information about the EU's NDC, legislation, and targets, please see the EU profile
Legislative process
France has a bicameral parliamentary system where legislative power belongs to the National Assembly and the Senate. The last election for the National Assembly was held in 2012, the next is scheduled for 2017. The Senate is elected indirectly by Members of Parliament and local representatives. Statute legislation may be proposed by the Council of Ministers or by Members of Parliament; the majority of bills ar

France has a bicameral parliamentary system where legislative power belongs to the National Assembly and the Senate. The last election for the National Assembly was held in 2012, the next is scheduled for 2017. The Senate is elected indirectly by Members of Parliament and local representatives. Statute legislation may be proposed by the Council of Ministers or by Members of Parliament; the majority of bills are currently proposed by the government.

There is a strict separation between laws and regulations. Laws determine general principles and rules in domains explicitly set out in the constitution, such as civil rights, nationality and crime. They must be voted on by the Parliament and can be blocked by the Constitutional Court if it finds that the law goes against the Constitution. In this case, the law must be modified and voted on again, or abandoned. Regulations can establish rules out­side of the law’s domain or specify more precisely how to implement laws. Regulations do not need to be voted on by the Parliament.

from the Grantham Research Institute
from the Grantham Research Institute
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