European Union

European Energy Security Strategy

Executive
Strategy
Passed in 2014
The Commission adopted the Energy Security Strategy in response to the political crisis in Ukraine and the overall importance of a stable and abundant supply of energy.
 The strategy seeks to respond to the high dependence on energy imports (53% total energy consumed imported, including 88% of crude oil, 66% of natural gas, 42% of solid fuels such as coal, 95% of uranium).
 In the short-term, the strategy proposes launching energy security stress tests to simulate disruptions in the gas supply for the coming winter. Other emergency plans and back-up mechanisms may include:
  • Increasing gas stocks
  • Developing emergency infrastructure such as reverse flows
  • Reducing short-term energy demand
  • Switching to alternative fuels
  • Developing new solidarity mechanisms with international partners
 In addition, the strategy addresses medium and long-term security of supply. It proposes actions in five main areas, with the first two particularly relevant to energy efficiency:
  • Increasing energy efficiency (especially in the buildings and industry sectors) to reach the 2030 energy and climate goals; demand management through information and transparency (clear billing information, smart energy meters)
  • Completing the internal energy market and developing missing infrastructure links to quickly respond to supply disruptions
  • Increasing energy production in the EU and diversifying supplier countries and routes
  • Speaking with one voice in external energy policy, use the information exchange mechanism with the Commission about planned agreements with third countries which may affect security of supply
  • Strengthening emergency and solidarity mechanisms and protecting critical infrastructure

Documents
from the Grantham Research Institute
from the Grantham Research Institute
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